Jadeveon Clowney considers insurance policy

Insurer says he referred USC standout to NCAA

GoGamecocks staff reportsFebruary 13, 2013 

South Carolina Gamecocks defensive end Jadeveon Clowney (7) is congratulated by head coach Steve Spurrier after their win over Michigan in the Outback Bowl at Raymond James Stadium.

GERRY MELENDEZ — gmelendez@thestate.com

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney is looking into an insurance policy for his junior season, the president of Coastal Advisors LLC told The State on Wednesday.

Richard Salgado, the president of Coastal Advisors LLC, said someone “connected with Clowney” called him about insurance and he said he told them they need to deal directly with the NCAA.

“I gave them the name and number of the guy at the NCAA that they need to deal with,” Salgado said. “That's the extent of it. The NCAA kids don't need me - they can deal directly with the NCAA.

“He has not taken out insurance with me. I am not insuring Jadeveon Clowney.”

Asked who called representing Clowney, Salgado said, “All these guys have so-called advisors.”

Salgado earlier told FOXSports.com's Alex Marvez that “a member of Clowney’s camp” inquired with his company about obtaining a policy worth as much as $5 million in case of a catastrophic injury that prematurely ends his playing career in 2013.

Coastal Advisors is the “leader in Life and Disability Needs” and provides “Professional Insurance Solutions,” according to its Web Site.

It has insured and guided 35 other top college prospects over the past 15 years, according to Marvez.

Former USC player Dunta Robinson, who now plays for the Atlanta Falcons, and former Clemson running back C. J. Spiller, who now plays for the Buffalo Bills, are listed as clients of Salgado.

“We’re the biggest in business,” Salgado said. “We insure a lot of Pro Bowl defensive ends.”

The NCAA has allowed football and men’s basketball players to purchase insurance since 1990. Baseball was added in 1991, men's ice hockey in 1993 and women's basketball in 1998. Loans can be arranged through the NCAA if the athlete or his family can’t afford to purchase the policy.

NFL draft experts have said Clowney would be a high pick in April’s draft, but he is ineligible to enter because NFL rules bar players who aren’t at least three years removed from high school.

The 6-foot-6, 256-pound Clowney, who will turn 20 on Thursday, had 13 sacks and 23.5 tackles for losses in his sophomore season.

Recently, out-of-state media speculation has centered on whether Clowney would be better off sitting out the 2013 season rather than risking an injury.

But Gamecocks coach Steve Spurrier on Tuesday dismissed that possibility.

“If money was his only goal in life, then he couldn’t play,” Spurrier told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “And he might not get into a car before next year’s draft so he wouldn’t be in a car wreck and get injured. He would be just very, very careful for a year not to have any kind of injury.

“But Jadeveon likes football. Football players play football. They don’t wait around on this, that or the other. He’s really good about avoiding injuries and so forth. He knows how to get out of harm’s way if there’s a big pileup around a tackle. I think the odds of him getting hurt are not nearly as much as a running back or somebody like that.”

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